When we say we are a media democracy, we mean it

The mean median mode of media literacy is that people can be trained to recognize the content of an article without knowing the source.

The median mode for right-wing media is that most people can understand what an article is about, and how it should be read.

“The fact that we are not a left-wing culture does not mean that we’re not a culture of misinformation,” Professor Robyn Hine said.

“But that’s not the case.

That is the culture of the right.”

Professor Hine’s research shows that misinformation is pervasive across all media.

“The more media outlets that are on the air, the more they are in the news,” she said.

She believes there are two main reasons why misinformation is spread.

“One is because people know that they are on TV, or on the internet, or have access to a social media platform, and that makes them more likely to spread misinformation,” she explained.

The other reason is because misinformation is shared amongst friends and family.

“It’s not a matter of people spreading it to friends and families, it’s shared amongst family members,” she added.

Professor Robyn said misinformation was also often shared by those who were “not actively involved in the creation of the news”.

“So when you’re watching news on television or you’re reading the news online, you’re not being part of the decision making process of how the news should be told to you,” she suggested.

Ms Dickson said the research showed that right-leaning audiences were particularly vulnerable to misinformation.

“There’s a certain amount of misinformation that gets spread by people who are on their own.”

They’re not thinking about it when they are being told to spread it,” she noted.

“Right wing audiences are not being informed about the issues they care about, they’re not getting informed about what’s happening in politics,” she argued. “

Media literacy in Australia is at an all time low,” she told News.

“Right wing audiences are not being informed about the issues they care about, they’re not getting informed about what’s happening in politics,” she argued.

In an interview with News.org.au, Ms Dickson also expressed concern about the future of media and the role of the media in society.

When we say that we have a media culture, we are saying that we value what we have and what we provide, and our role is to provide that to the people who consume it, she said, pointing to the role that newspapers played in the development of the internet.

While Ms Dixons research found that the right wing was the most affected by misinformation, it also found that left-leaning and progressive audiences were more likely than conservatives to be influenced by misinformation.

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